Guatemala, Central America

LIST OF INSURANCE COMPANIES IN GUATEMALA 

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Giant kites made by residents of Sumpango, in the municipality of Sacatepequez, some 48 km west of Guatemala City, Guatemala, for celebrating All Saints day on November 1, 2009. (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Giant kites made by residents of Sumpango, in the municipality of Sacatepequez, about 48 km west of Guatemala City, Guatemala, for having celebrated All Saints Day on November 1, 2009 (JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images)

LIST OF LOGOS OF INSURERS IN GUATEMALA

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Guatemala | World
Guatemala | World

Aseguradoras en GuatemalaAseguradoras en Guatemala
BMI COMPAÑÍA DE SEGUROS DE GUATEMALTECA, S. A.SEGUROS UNIVERSALES, S. A.
AIG SEGUROS, S. A.PAN-AMERICAN LIFE INSURANCE, COMPAÑÍA DE SEGUROS, S. A.
SEGUROS ALIANZA, S. A.DEPARTAMENTO DE SEGUROS Y PREVISIÓN DE EL CRÉDITO E HIPOTECARIO NACIONAL
SEGUROS G&T, S. A.ASEGURADORA GENERAL, S. A.
SEGUROS EL ROBLE, S. A.ASEGURADORA GUATEMALTECA, S. A.
SEGUROS DE OCCIDENTE, S. A.ASEGURADORA LA CEIBA, S. A.
ASEGURADORA DE LOS TRABAJADORES.COLUMNA, COMPAÑÍA DE SEGUROS, S. A
MAPFRE, S. A.SEGUROS AGROMERCANTIL, S. A.
ASEGURADORA RURAL, S. A. DEPARTAMENTO DE FIANZAS DE EL CRÉDITO HIPOTECARIO NACIONAL DE GUATEMALA
AFIANZADORA GUATEMALTECA, S. A. AFIANZADORA G&T, S. A.
ASEGURADORA FIDELIS, S. A.FIANZAS DE OCCIDENTE, S. A.
FIANZAS EL ROBLE, S. A.SEGUROS PRIVANZA, S. A.
CORPORACIÓN DE FIANZAS, CONFIANZA, S. A.AFIANZADORA SOLIDARIA, S. A.
AFIANZADORA DE LA NACIÓN, S. A.BUPA, COMPAÑÍA DE SEGUROS, S. A.

ECONOMY IN GUATEMALA

​Guatemala is the most populous of the Central American countries with a GDP per capita roughly one-third that of Brazil’s. Coffee, sugar, and bananas are the main products.

The 1996 signing of peace accords, which ended 36 years of civil war, removed a major obstacle to foreign investment, and Guatemala since then has pursued important reforms and macroeconomic stabilization.

On 1 July 2006, the Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA) entered into force between the US and Guatemala and has since spurred increased investment in the export sector.

The distribution of income remains highly unequal with 12% of the population living below the international poverty line. Given Guatemala’s large expatriate community in the United States, it is the top remittance recipient in Central America, with inflows serving as a primary source of foreign income equivalent to nearly two-thirds of exports.

Guatemala’s Gross domestic product for 1990 was estimated at $19.1 billion, with real growth slowing to approximately 3.3%. Ten years later in 2000 it rose by 1 to 4% and in 2010 it decreased back to 3% (World Bank). After the signing of the final peace accord in December 1996, Guatemala was well-positioned for rapid economic growth over the next 10 years.

Guatemala’s economy is dominated by the private sector, which generates about 85% of GDP. Most manufacturing is light assembly and food processing, geared to the domestic, U.S., and Central American markets.

Over the past several years, tourism and exports of textiles, apparel, and nontraditional agricultural products such as winter vegetables, fruit, and cut flowers, have boomed, while more traditional exports such as sugar, bananas, and coffee continue to represent a large share of the export market.

The United States is the country’s largest trading partner, providing 36% of Guatemala’s imports and receiving 40% of its exports. The government sector is small and shrinking, with its business activities limited to, public utilities—some of which have been privatized—ports and airports and several development-oriented financial institutions.

Guatemala was certified to receive export trade benefits under the United States’ Caribbean Basin Trade and Partnership Act (CBTPA) in October 2000, and enjoys access to U.S. Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) benefits. Due to concerns over serious worker rights protection issues, however, Guatemala’s benefits under both the CBTPA and GSP are currently under review.

Poor women and unpaid work
In Guatemala in 2010 31% of the female population was illiterate.

In the rural parts of Guatemala, 70.5% are poor, and therefore women are more likely to be poor in the most rural areas. Gammage argues that women in poor households engage more domestic tasks and undertake the majority of household maintenance, social reproduction and care work than men.

Similarly, Benería states that the women perform tough work but do not get paid and argues that there is an opportunity cost related, since the women could be paid for different jobs instead. Unpaid household work is associated with the number of people in the household, the location, and the availability of paid employment.

Unfortunately, this means that women in the more rural parts of Guatemala are greater victims of poverty than the urban women, which is why most poverty is found in the rural parts of Guatemala. Due to this poverty, Gammage has found that many women in the rural parts perform unpaid work.

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